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Wednesday, December 17, 2014

Weird Job Wednesday -I just can't BEAR it!

Did you ever want to be a veterinarian or a surgeon? 

Do you want to be that special person that brings "life" back to torn and damaged stuffed animals?

 YOU CAN! You can become a TEDDY BEAR REPAIR TECHNICIAN... and YES, there are jobs available.   


Build-A-Bear Workshop, a $395M company employs technicians just to fix damaged bears, and they say that the most frequent trauma suffered is from dog attacks. We found some hospitals devoted to Bears online and  - Teddy Bear Hospital of Pittsburgh, but if you learn this skill, you could consider freelancing.

If you prefer to nurse injured human dolls perhaps American Girl Hospital is the career ever little girl dreams of. For more WEIRD JOBS visit us at Pinterest-WeirdJobWednesday

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10 Reasons To Hire Older Workers






1.) Older workers have lower absenteeism rates than younger employees.

2.) Older workers have lower turnover rates than younger employees.

3.) Older employees are generally more loyal employees.

4.) Older employees have less job injuries than younger employees.

5.) Older employees are less likely to steal from your company.

6.) Older employees bring a wealth of experience with them to work.

7.) Older employees generally have a strong work ethic.

8.) Older workers generally find satisfaction with and enjoy their work.

9.) Older workers want to work, at least part-time, even after they retire.

10.) You will one day be an older worker.

What's your opinion on this? Do you agree with the 10 reasons to hire older workers? Are the myths true in any nature?

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Tuesday, December 16, 2014

Did you Interview for the Job Interview?

Attend this FREE webinar to learn PERFECT INTERVIEW ANSWERSREGISTER HERE.

How many hours did you spend researching that last car or flat panel tv you bought? How many hours did you spend practicing for your job interviews? We all know that many jobs and perhaps careers are won or lost during the interview process. You have a Great resume, Great cover letter and Great attire. Win win win. Not so fast. If you did not prepare for the interview this will put you at a competitive disadvantage. So why not prepare? It really is pretty easy. Just requires some practice and time.(Editor's Note)

Lies We Tell Ourselves About Job Interviews
Guest Contributor: Michael Neece, CEO, InterviewMastery.com


I present frequently to groups large (200+) and small on job interview skills, and I am constantly amazed at the harmful lies people tell themselves about job interviews.


Few will argue about the importance of having a great resume; after all, it is the resume that generates job interviews. But nearly all job seekers minimize the importance of their own job interview skills. Minimizing the importance of interview skills reduces the probability of getting the job offer because it is only through an exceptional job interview performance that you'll get hired.


17-to-one is the ratio of job interviews to job offers during a recession. During a recession, the average applicant will interview for 17 different opportunities before he/she gets one job offer. When job openings are plentiful and candidates are in high demand, the ratio drops to 6-to-1, meaning it takes only 6 interviews to get an offer during the good times. The lesson here is that without interview skills, you'll waste 6 to 17 job opportunities before you get good enough at interviews to get an offer. (Article Continued Below)

Below are six lies (assumptions) we tell ourselves about job interviews:
"I'll do great on my job interviews because…"


1. I'm Great at My Job.
The skills required to get the job are fundamentally different from the skills required to do a job. If you have ever looked for a job you know this all too well.


2. I'm a Good Communicator
Being a good communicator is a good start, but most of our business communicating is one-on-one or in a setting where you are talking about work. During the job interview, you are often speaking with multiple interviewers and responding to thought-provoking questions about you and your talents. Convincing an interviewer of your abilities is a unique situation in the world of business communications.


3. I've Interviewed Hundreds of People
Being an interviewer is different from being interviewed. Just ask anyone who has been interviewed recently. I consult internationally to organizations on interviewer skills. I also present to thousands each year on job interviewing for the job seeker. While the interviewer and the interviewee are in the same room, each is playing a different role that requires different skills to be successful. It's a bit like dancing. One person leads while the other follows. The skills to lead are very different from the talents needed to follow. When each partner does his/her part, they dance beautifully. When the job applicant has the skills, he/she facilitates a conversation and usually gets the offer.


4. I've Had Many Practice Interviews
Learning by trial and error can teach you a few things about effective interviewing, but it wastes a lot of great job opportunities. Besides, practicing the same unproductive job interview ritual will only make you comfortable with ineffective habits that can really hurt your career.


5. Interviewers Have Interviewing Skills
Having traveled internationally to train interviewers, I can state with certainty that over 95% of interviewers are unskilled and have had no training on effective interviewing. That is exactly why interviewers still ask totally irrelevant and bogus questions like, “Tell me about yourself,” and “What are your strengths and weaknesses?” When an interviewers asks you one of these questions, you know they are completely unskilled at interviewing.


6. The Most Qualified, Get Hired Most of the Time
Eleven years as a recruiter taught me one truth about the job market: the most qualified person never gets hired. The reason is that who is the most qualified is a matter of interviewer opinions, assumptions, and personal bias. Additionally, a job description is actually a collection of guesses as to what the prerequisites are for a specific job. A job description is a way for the hiring manager to say, “I want to hire someone who has already done, many times, what I want him or her to do for me.”

To secure a great job, you can either continue lying to yourself and go through 17 interviews before you get an offer, or you can invest the energy to learn successful job interviewing and significantly increase your odds of getting a great job sooner.

Whether you try Interview Mastery or another job interview program is irrelevant. What really matters, is that you improve your interview skills. Common advice is everywhere on the Internet, but this common wisdom will only get you common results.

If you don't want to invest any money in yourself, at least make a list of the interview questions you expect and those that you fear. Then ask a former colleague to mock interview you using the questions you listed. Record the mock interview using audio or video. You may be surprised at how you actually sound.Remember, the job interview is the most important moment in your job search and in your career.

While your resume may get you to the interview, it is your job interview skills that will secure the job offer. Preparation and practice make all the difference in your performance because the most qualified person rarely gets the job. It's the person who interviews the best who wins the job offer.

Good luck on your next interview. You're going to be awesome!


Do you need to improve your interview skills? Learn More Here.



Would you like to Create  Brilliantly Crafted Cover Letters? Start Now.
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    Monday, December 15, 2014

    7 Mistakes Job Seekers Over 50 Make and How to Avoid Them


    FREE WEBINAR:  “5 Tips to Battle Ageism”  CLICK HERE

    A good portion of the e-mail I receive is from readers over age 50 who are looking for work after a layoff. Many tell me they found their last job more than a decade ago, in the classifieds of their local newspaper. Many more say they're daunted -- understandably so -- by the foul job market, the prospect of ageism and the likelihood of being interviewed by someone half their age

    All of them worry about the generalizations some short-sighted employers make about older workers. Either they see you as overqualified and overpriced, or they believe you're inflexible and technologically challenged. Perhaps they suspect you're just biding your time and taking up space until retirement rolls around.

    We've all heard countless career experts (yours truly included) offer the same old job hunting solutions for workers over 50:

    But platitudes will only get you so far. So let's talk about the top mistakes that hopeful hires over age 50 make and how to avoid them.

    Telling Yourself That No One Hires Older Workers

    I hear a lot of 50- and 60-somethings make this complaint. Yes, older candidates have to work harder to overcome discrimination, and no, it's not fair. But that doesn't mean every employer is hell-bent on shutting out all candidates over 35.

    Example: The site RetirementJobs.com lists more than 30,000 full-time and part-time jobs nationwide with "age-friendly employers." Other job sites that cater to older workers: Jobs 4.0, Retired Brains, Seniors4Hire and Workforce50.com. In addition, AARP offers this list of the best employers for workers over 50.

    So, please, don't tell me no one's hiring older workers.


     Learn more on how to Ace your next Job Interview. Click Here Now

     Save time by posting your resume instantly to 75 job sites. Start Here.


    Putting an Expiration Date on Contacts 

    You've been on this crazy hamster wheel we call "work" for at least three decades now, so you might as well milk the vast contact list you've amassed for all its worth. It's perfectly acceptable to reach out to former employers, co-workers, vendors, classmates and other colleagues you haven't corresponded with in a decade or two. (Searching sites like LinkedIn and Facebook make finding them a snap.) Not only will your peers understand, more of them are likely reaching out to their long-lost contacts, too.


    Get Your Free: 49 Benefits To Hiring An Older Skilled Worker.

    Click here to read part 2 of this article

    CLICK HERE TO READ THE FULL ARTICLE POSTED ABOVE

     
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